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Duncan, King and Walcott: City, State and National Reformers Gather to Discuss the State of Education

by Allison Rizzolo

Thursday, June 7th, 2012

For the first time ever, Secretary Arne Duncan, Commissioner John King and Chancellor Dennis Walcott gathered together in one room to talk about education reform. During Philanthropy New York's 33rd Annual Meeting, on Monday, June 4th, the three education reformers addressed controversial subjects such as teacher effectiveness, student assessments, Common Core and school turnaround.

During the discussion, moderated by WNYC's Beth Fertig, there was a surprising and encouraging degree of agreement among the education leaders, who represented the city, state and national levels. All three repeatedly returned to a number of basic principles and values.

Giving our children access to a well-rounded education is our utmost priority. With Common Core, which was mapped backward from a lens of college and career success, the education leaders hope the system can move toward a well-rounded model of education. People who know more about the world tend to read better, said Commissioner King.

We need to lift up and strengthen the teaching profession. "When we say teaching doesn't matter, we demean these extraordinary teachers and principals that are making an amazing difference in our students' lives," said Secretary Duncan. All three agreed that it would do no good to simply raise the bar and tell students to meet it; our education system needs to also help our teachers teach more effectively.

We need multiple measurements. Whether we are assessing students, teachers, principals, schools or states, we have to look at multiple measures and avoid situations where reliance on one measure creates perverse incentives that are harmful to students.

"I think we're in a golden age of changing education like never before," said Chancellor Walcott. Yet with our economic reality and fiscal challenges, is this "golden age" sustainable? All three pointed to the importance of philanthropy in helping the education system and third-party organizations, like Public Agenda, which experiment with innovations, integrate technology, build strong leadership and support the courses that contribute to a well-rounded education.

"If you want our children to do better in math, try some music. If you want to our kids to sit and concentrate in class, try some recess," said Secretary Duncan. "We can't let tough budget times be an excuse for perpetuating the status quo that is not working for our young people."

A recording of the panel is available online, and you can read tweets from the event as well. Want to join the discussion? Mention @PublicAgenda on Twitter and use the hashtag #PNYMeet.




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