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Real Discussions with Real People: A Conversation about Job Creation

by Allison Rizzolo

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

During the economic downturn, 450,000 residents of the New York / New Jersey / Connecticut region lost their jobs. While that's a lot of people out of work, we were still better off than most of the nation. As a region, what strengths can we leverage and how can we collaborate - as citizens, business leaders, students or community members - to support job creation in the tri-state area? And what choices, challenges and tradeoffs will we have to weigh in doing so?

Last month, during "The Jobs Crisis: From Arguments to Solutions," Public Agenda gathered with a group of local stakeholders - from entrepreneurs to retirees, from college presidents to students - to weigh in on our region's priorities and discuss how we can best collaborate and invest our resources to create jobs.

We were also joined by a pair of experts - Chris Jones from the Regional Plan Association, an expert in regional job creation, and Public Agenda's Jean Johnson, an expert on what the jobs crisis means to the public and the author of Where Did the Jobs Go?

While we weren't intending to solve the region's job problem in the space of an hour and a half, we hoped to help participants elaborate on their own thinking. Our public engagement team facilitated table dialogues on one facet of the situation: how to prioritize investments in both human and physical infrastructure - education, transportation, child care and housing - as it relates to job creation.

All of the evening's participants agreed that education - both K-12 and higher ed - was the most important investment that the region can and must make: If you don't have an educated workforce, everything else falls apart, was one table's takeaway. Participants also considered all four choices as both important and interconnected and recognized that the concern of how to pay for this investment looms large. All in all, participants viewed their investment prioritization with a good deal of nuance, and the event provided a means for authentic deliberation around an important issue, instead of just an artificial debate.

We hope, through events such as this one, we can open up the conversation around critical yet divisive issues to embrace a broader level of thinking that transcends a politically polarized and unproductive debate. If you are in the New York region and interested in participating in an event like this in the future, let us know!




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