Public Agenda
On the Agenda The Public Agenda Blog

05.13 Engaging Ideas - 5/13

Friday, May 13th, 2016 | Public Agenda





Every week we curate stories and reports on complex issues including democracy, public engagement, opportunity, education and health care.


Democracy

Room for Debate: Is Tyranny Around the Corner? (The New York Times)

A Washington Post piece claimed that a sizable number of Americans are supposedly wary about democracy, and Andrew Sullivan has written that Trump’s rise shows that we’re ripe for tyranny. Others have spoken of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders as dual demagogues. But are Americans looking for an autocrat to take charge or simply a government that gets things done, works in their interest and truly represents them? Is America tired of democracy, or yearning for more of it?


Opportunity

Interactive: Where the Middle Class Is Shrinking (The Upshot)

Take a look at the 100 metro areas with the sharpest decline in the percentage of people in the middle class. In these areas, the middle class declined by more than 4 percentage points. (The decline in the New York-Newark-Jersey City area was not as steep, falling from 50.7 to 48.1 percent)


Engagement

The Lessons of Boaty McBoatface (The Atlantic)

The parliamentary inquiry revealed one important way in which the campaign wasn’t a success: NERC and its partners in the British government don’t appear to have sufficiently planned for the day after launching the naming contest. They invited the public to engage with their project, but then didn’t clearly define what level of engagement they were ultimately seeking—and how to proceed if and when people actually engaged en masse. What’s the point of getting people involved if their involvement stops at voting in an online poll?

Report: Nonprofits Integrating Community Engagement Guide (Building Movement Project)

The Nonprofits Integrating Community Engagement (NICE) Guide is designed for organizational development experts, management support organizations, and internal and external consultants to facilitate efforts to integrate the voice of community members and constituents into the daily practice of nonprofit organizations.


Click to read more | Comment

05.12 Now We Know: Participatory Budgeting in the U.S. and Canada

Thursday, May 12th, 2016 | Allison Rizzolo



Are you one of the 70,000 people who voted in participatory budgeting last year? Residents of the United States and Canada helped decide how their community should spend nearly $50 million in 2014-15 through this public engagement process.

Participatory budgeting (PB) has grown exponentially in the U.S. and Canada in the past few years. Until now, we haven't had a clear idea of its use and immediate outcomes: How do communities implement PB? Who participates? How much money is spent? What sorts of projects does PB end up funding?

Over the past year, we've been working with people coordinating and evaluating PB locally in order to answer these and other questions. We analyzed data from 46 communities in the U.S. and Canada to provide the first-ever comprehensive look at the state of PB in the U.S. and Canada in 2014-15.


Click to read more | Comment

05.09 Higher Education Engagement and Collaboration in the Land of Enchantment

Monday, May 9th, 2016 | Erin Knepler and Zoe Mintz



With the unprecedented amount of pressure it's under, it's clear that our nation's higher education system is due for change. Escalating costs are painful for students, families, taxpayers and schools alike. And the traditional college schedule doesn't work for many modern students.

Yet as we experiment with new ways to structure and deliver learning in higher education, we need to remember who's on the receiving end of these reforms: students. Changes to the higher education system could have real consequences for their future and, consequently, for our country's economic health.

It's important for our higher education system to adapt and change, but it's equally important for those changes to happen in a space that protects students and taxpayers and helps institutions learn from each other. One example of such a space is the Competency-Based Education Network (C-BEN), for which Public Agenda is a supporting partner.

C-BEN was established in 2013 to help colleges and universities work together on common challenges to building high-quality, sustainable competency-based education (CBE) models. Competency-based education (CBE) is one of the major innovations in the higher education field. CBE is an education model that measures students' learning based on their demonstrated level of competency rather than by the amount of time they spend in a classroom.


Click to read more | Comment

05.03 For Charter Schools Week, Resources that Keep the Issue in Perspective

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016 | Allison Rizzolo



This week recognizes one of the most controversial issues in K-12 education today: charter schools. For some people, charter schools are saviors of students and parents looking for alternatives to failing public schools. For others, they're the devil, a threat to America’s public schools and to the very idea of public education.

But while advocates and critics battle over charter schools, many people stand somewhere in the middle. Perhaps we're not quite sure what we think about charter schools. Perhaps we suspect the issues may be more complex than the narratives we hear in the media or from advocates on either side of debates over charter schools. Perhaps we're confused about what charter schools even are (we're not alone – even some presidential candidates are confused!)

On this divided issue, it's hard to get a handle on what resources and information to trust. The polarization and intensity of the debate over charter schools can make it difficult for policymakers, educators and community members to understand and weigh practical solutions to improve schools for all children.

Public Agenda seeks to present nonpartisan, non-ideological information about charter schools with a project called Charter Schools In Perspective. Our goal is to help people learn more about the pros and cons of charters and have better, more civil conversations about them. We want to help communities, educators, policymakers and journalists understand different approaches to educational policies and practices and the impacts those have on all kids.


Click to read more | Comment

04.29 Engaging Ideas - 4/29

Friday, April 29th, 2016 | Public Agenda





Every week we curate stories and reports on complex issues including democracy, public engagement, opportunity, education and health care.


Democracy

How Would You Spend $1 Million In Your Neighborhood? (WBEZ)

WBEZ Chicago city politics reporter Lauren Chooljian speaks with listeners about how they would spend the money, even if their aldermen aren’t participating.

Idea to retire: Technology alone fosters collaboration and networks (Brookings)

Jane Fountain writes: The fallacy that technology alone fosters collaboration and networks is so pervasive that I’ve written a white paper for the presidential transition recommending that the next administration include “management” as a key part of transition, specifically management to develop and sustain interagency collaboration. This paper notes the technology’s inability to foster collaborative networks by itself, and highlights an emerging ecosystem of institutions that support effective and sustainable collaboration across agencies. In the ecosystem, each organization fills a niche or specific role. These niche organizations interact to implement policies and manage initiatives across the federal government. While some dimensions of the ecosystem focus on information technology, most reinforce and support the many organizational changes that make interagency initiatives feasible and sustainable over time.


Engagement

Constructive or Quixotic? Another Donor Devotes Millions to Improve Civic Discourse (Inside Philanthropy)

Repugnant and childish political mudslinging is as old as the country itself. Can a big university gift help to alter the dynamic that's seemingly embedded in our civic DNA? Jonathan and Lizzie Tisch, prefer to do something about it. The couple donated $15 million to the former Tisch College at the Medford, Massachusetts-based Tufts College, which will henceforth be known as the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life, whose goal is to "develop a comment of leaders who are able to rise above the fray and bring positive change to the public sphere."

Why It’s Getting Harder to Learn What the Public Thinks (Governing)

Public officials need to understand how opinion research is evolving to meet modern challenges. Adam Davis, founder and principal of DHM Research writes: Done well -- using demographic quotas and statistical weighting to assure representative samples -- online panels should be accepted as a legitimate sample source for public-sector surveys.


Click to read more | Comment

04.28 With Dialogue, People's Opinions Can Change and Do Stick

Thursday, April 28th, 2016 | Allison Rizzolo




Photo: Olivia Chow via Flickr.

I have a distinct memory of listening to the This American Life segment, "Do Ask, Do Tell." I was cleaning my kitchen, nodding along to the story of how a group of canvassers and researchers found that a simple 20-minute conversation could change someone’s mind about controversial issues like gay marriage and abortion.

In our work, we've often seen how dialogue between people with different perspectives and life experiences often leads to a shift in thinking. It was exciting to hear this phenomenon broadcast on an immensely popular national platform.

I ran over to my computer as soon as the segment was finished and emailed my colleagues, telling them to listen to the episode.

If you followed the story, you know that shortly after the segment aired the study was found to have been falsified.


Click to read more | Comment

04.19 A Lesson in Community Engagement from Austin, Texas

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016 | Allison Rizzolo




In Austin, Texas, residents are grappling with increasing development. Photo: Ed Schipul via Flickr.

At Public Agenda, we like to practice what we preach. So last week, I attended a neighborhood association meeting in Austin, Texas, where I'm visiting.

The community where I'm staying while I'm here is facing the impending development of property that abuts many neighborhood houses. This development has dominated neighborhood association meeting agendas for the past year. At last week's meeting, community residents had the opportunity to engage with local environmental officials on their questions and concerns.

Community members seem to generally support the idea of the development. They welcome new retail, restaurants and housing to the area. At the same time, they are rightfully worried about the impact the development will have on their property and the neighborhood. In particular, the neighborhood, situated along a creek, struggles with flooding and drainage issues. The traffic is also already something of a nightmare around here, and residents are concerned about the volume of cars that will be added to the road once the development is built.

Last week's meeting showcased many effective principles of public engagement. At the same time, there were a few ways in which the local association could improve their engagement processes, especially when it comes to inclusivity.

I'll start with the pros:


Click to read more | Comment

04.15 Tax Reform: It's Complicated, but Many Americans Want to See Washington Try

Friday, April 15th, 2016 | Chloe Rinehart




Photo: Reynermedia via Flickr.

If you listen to the media or to candidate talking points, you may be under the impression that Americans hate taxes.

It's true that an anti-tax movement has taken root in the past few years, though this movement seems largely peripheral.

Still, the movement makes for a good media story and is supported by unscientific polling data. These polls purport to show how much Americans hate being taxed. Yet in reality, they really just show how much respondents like the IRS when compared with leading presidential candidates, the Pope or Kanye West.

Politicians seem to have largely bought in to this narrative. Republicans propose tax cuts and promise no new taxes. Democrats often propose only slight income tax hikes on wealthier citizens, and have kept many of the Bush-era tax cuts in place.

The result is that the country misses out on an honest, grounded reckoning about how much public money we ought to collect and how we want to spend it. And the public's true voice on the issue is at best ignored and at worst coaxed to extremes.

So, how do Americans really feel about taxes– about how much they pay, about where their tax money goes, about the tax code and about proposed reforms?


Click to read more | Comment

04.15 Engaging Ideas - 4/15

Friday, April 15th, 2016 | Public Agenda





Every week we curate stories and reports on complex issues including democracy, public engagement, opportunity, education and health care.


Democracy

Column: How to Fix Politics (The New York Times)

David Brooks writes: Starting just after World War II, America’s community/membership mind-set gave way to an individualistic/autonomy mind-set. The idea was that individuals should be liberated to live as they chose, so long as they didn’t interfere with the rights of others. By 1981, the pollster Daniel Yankelovich noticed the effects: “Throughout most of this century Americans believed that self-denial made sense, sacrificing made sense, obeying the rules made sense, subordinating oneself to the institution made sense. But now doubts have set in, and Americans now believe that the old giving/getting compact needlessly restricts the individual while advancing the power of large institutions … who use the power to enhance their own interests at the expense of the public.”

Opinion: Bipartisanship Isn’t for Wimps, After All (The New York Times)

Arthur C. Brooks writes: There is a Polarization Industrial Complex in American media today, which profits handsomely from the continuing climate of bitterness. Not surprisingly, polarization in the House and Senate is at its highest since the end of Reconstruction in the 1870s.


Engagement

Interactive: Mapping How the Public Gains Information (Democracy Fund)

Understanding the role of local news and public engagement requires a systems-thinking lens that takes into consideration not only the strength of individual news outlets, but also the influence of the local economy, demographics, technological infrastructure, and the policy environment — as well as the agency of citizens to find, interpret, and share the information needed for civic involvement. The Local News & Participation systems map is an open-source tool that welcomes engagement by researchers, media companies, government and nonprofit agencies, funders, and others. Through user involvement, we expect this map to be made more accurate, complete, and practical as a vehicle for improving how the public gains access to information and participates in democracy. We invite you to explore the map and its elements in Kumu. As you do, we hope you will tell us how to better describe and illuminate the dynamics of the Local News & Participation system. Throughout 2016, we will hold webinars and work sessions to involve new perspectives and strengthen this map.

Solutions journalism increases optimism, builds self-efficacy -- and lasts longer, too (Medium)

In the experiment, a sample of 834 U.S. adults saw one of two online news articles, both reporting on the struggles of the working poor. The articles were nearly identical in length and reading level, had the same headline, and contained the same photograph. The only difference between the two was that one version focused on the working poor’s hardships, while the other reported on the hardships and how some organizations were coming to the aid of the working poor. In other words, one version was about a problem, while the other also included information about solutions to the problem.


Click to read more | Comment

04.14 Fixing Politics by Strengthening Networks for Engagement

Thursday, April 14th, 2016 | Matt Leighninger




David Brooks argues that strong community networks are essential for successful politics. Photo: Ryan Johnson via Flickr

As David Brooks pointed out in his column on “How to Fix Politics,” our political system has reached a perilous state of dysfunction and distrust, and it is unlikely that any solutions to this crisis will come from the political parties or their presidential candidates.

Brooks is also right that the partisanship and incivility that plague our politics are not just due to poor manners or bad process skills. They are based in much deeper structural flaws in how leaders and communities engage each other around important issues and resulting strains in the relationship between citizens and government.

Brooks argues that strong community networks are essential for successful politics, and uses a 1981 quote from one of our founders, Daniel Yankelovich, to illustrate how long the weakening of those networks has been going on. “If we’re going to salvage our politics,” Brooks says, we’ll have to “nurture the thick local membership web that politics rests within.”

This kind of argument is often dismissed as a sentimental notion, or a lament over our lack of civic virtue, but it shouldn’t be. There are specific proposals and measures that can accomplish it.

Strengthening networks for engagement should be one of our top public priorities, and there are in fact a number of concrete ways to move forward on it. Much of our work at Public Agenda centers on these challenges, and we are part of a field of other organizations and leaders – from neighborhood organizers to innovative public officials – who have pioneered more productive formats and structures for democratic politics.

There are two kinds of communication that need to be happening for those networks to strengthen and grow. One kind, as Brooks references, is “thick” engagement that is intensive, informed and deliberative. In these kinds of settings, people are able to share their experiences, learn more about public problems, consider a range of solutions or policy options and decide how they want to act.


Click to read more | Comment

1  . . .   2   3   4   Page 5    6   7   8  . . .  33  Next >>